There is absolutely nothing better than a fresh egg in the morning. Whether scrambled, poached, or boiled, eggs provide an excellent source of protein that supports the functions of every cell in your body. But whether to go brown or white is the dilemma at the grocery store that has people questioning our favorite breakfast friend.
In the egg section you’ll find free range, grass fed, organic, brown, and white eggs. Free range and grass fed labels seem to speak for themselves; free range meaning they have access to living conditions similar to their natural environment and grass fed indicating that they are fed grass, and not any of the customary genetically modified feed and corn. And organic, of course, means the chickens have been fed an organic diet.

There is absolutely nothing better than a fresh egg in the morning. Whether scrambled, poached, or boiled, eggs provide an excellent source of protein that supports the functions of every cell in your body. But whether to go brown or white is the dilemma at the grocery store that has people questioning our favorite breakfast friend.
In the egg section you’ll find free range, grass fed, organic, brown, and white eggs. Free range and grass fed labels seem to speak for themselves; free range meaning they have access to living conditions similar to their natural environment and grass fed indicating that they are fed grass, and not any of the customary genetically modified feed and corn. And organic, of course, means the chickens have been fed an organic diet.

But what is the difference between the white and brown eggs?

Other than the obvious color difference, there is nothing different in white or brown eggs. The color comes from the breed of hen. Typically, light colored hens such as those with white feathers lay white eggs. Hens with dark feathers then lay brown eggs.

Even more interesting is that eggs don’t only have to come in the colors brown and white. The hens that lay white eggs come from the breeds Leghorns or Minorca, while the brown eggs can come from Rhode Island Red, Orpington, Wyandotte, Marans, Welsumer, and Barnevelder. But consider the Araucana or the Cream Legbar hens. They lay blue eggs!

One difference that you might notice in the grocery store is that brown eggs generally cost a bit more. This is due to the breed of chicken. Those that lay brown eggs tend to be bigger in size, resulting in a need for more feed than other chickens. This does not mean that the eggs are more nutritious or better for the environment. The information on an egg’s nutrition can only be seen inside the egg itself.

The basic components of the egg are the yolk, chalazae (the white stringy strands), shell, and outer and inner albumen. The freshest and most nutritious eggs have more of the chalazae, well formed round yolks, and thick whites. And did you know that the color of the yolk is not an indication of quality, it is merely a reflection of the hen’s diet. For example, hens that eat wheat or barley tend to have lighter colored yolks. Those that feed on yellow corn or alfalfa have medium yellow yolks.

With this information, hopefully you’ll be better prepared the next time you’re faced with that eggstremely important decision….white or brown?